Skip to main content
Updating results

United Kingdom

Richard Thompson’s combination of skills as a songwriter and guitarist is unmatched. The musician’s career — from his rise with British folk-rock inventors Fairport Convention to his 1970s partnership with his wife Linda Thompson to three decades as a solo artist — stretches over 50 years. But Thompson’s new memoir, which was written with Scott Timberg, zeroes in on only the first eight. It’s ...

“The Irish Diaspora: Tales of Emigration, Exile and Imperialism” by Turtle Bunbury; Thames & Hudson (304 pages, $34.95) ——— Ireland’s greatest export was always its people. Some fled famine, violence, or poverty. Others sought love, adventure, or fortune. And Turtle Bunbury’s “The Irish Diaspora: Tales of Emigration, Exile and Imperialism” pays them tribute. The word diaspora comes from Greek ...

"The Wild Silence" by Raynor Winn; Penguin Books (288 pages, $17) ——— Immediately upon finishing Raynor Winn's 2019 memoir, "The Salt Path," I went to the computer and called up Google. "What happened to Moth?" I typed. I needed to know; In the course of reading that powerful book, Winn and her husband, Moth Walker, had become important to me. Winn's gorgeous new memoir, "The Wild Silence," ...

Americans who have been cooped up at home, dreaming of vacations, are excited to explore the world again armed with the inoculations that are rolling out here.

Maisie Dobbs is trying not to let World War II get her down. The efficient private detective of Jacqueline Winspear's almost-annual series is back for her 16th outing, having taken off 2020 so Winspear could publish a memoir, "This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing." Beginning with "Maisie Dobbs," largely set in 1929 but with flashbacks to before World War I, the novels have followed Maisie ...

"Klara and the Sun" by Kazuo Ishiguro; Knopf (320 pages, $28) ——— Klara, the narrator of the new novel by Kazuo Ishiguro, isn’t human, but understanding humans is her mission. In "Klara and the Sun," the reader follows her in that mission, in a world that seems like our own in a none too distant future. It’s a dazzling and deeply moving journey. Ishiguro, who was born in Japan but has lived ...

Mystery, lies and intense family drama such as only the British can manufacture all crash together in the latest book from the bestselling author of "The Au Pair." Set in 1988 at Raven Hall, a remote Gothic estate near London, the story revolves around two young teens. Beth is orphaned, living in a drab children's home; Nina is an only child at the grand manor. When Nina's parents decide to ...

"Pianos and Flowers," by Alexander McCall Smith Every picture tells a story, right? So when the Times of London asked Alexander McCall Smith to write six fictional tales for publication in the Sunday newspaper, McCall Smith went to the Times' photo archives first, for inspiration. The photos he chose are all old black-and-white pictures from early in the past century, mysterious images of ...

"The paradox is that you can create quite a lot of emotion, when you have a voice that isn't inclined to express emotion." Kazuo Ishiguro, the Nobel Prize-winning novelist whose works include "The Remains of the Day" and "Never Let Me Go," could be talking about a number of his characters, but in this case he's describing the main character in his new novel, "Klara and the Sun." Klara, the ...

In the near present, a woman whose marriage is crumbling lifts a tiny sky-blue vial from the bank of the Thames River. In 1791, a 12-year-old girl who has helped commit a murder fills that vial with a potion she hopes will change her life. What links them, besides that bit of blue glass, is the subject of "The Lost Apothecary," a debut novel by Sarah Penner, who lives in St. Petersburg. The ...

She was born in slavery, but she would not be chained. Long after the Civil War ended, Ida B. Wells continued to fight for freedom. She battled segregation, wrote groundbreaking exposés, and marched for women’s suffrage. Wells set out to change the law and ended up inspiring a nation. Her descendants have long cherished her memory. Now her great-granddaughter, Michelle Duster, pays tribute in ...

"An Extravagant Death" by Charles Finch; Minotaur (288 pages, $27.99) ——— As a kid reading Agatha Christie's novels, I longed for the well-traveled writer who set her mysteries all over the world, to ship Hercule Poirot or Miss Marple to America to badger Yanks and solve a puzzle-like string of murders. It never happened but I am delighted to report that Charles Finch, whose books usually are ...

In this special Valentine's Day edition of Paperback Picks: a multitude of novels about love, in all its beautiful variety. Some of these are favorites of mine; some are books I've been meaning to get to; all should provide some pleasantly heart-shaped distraction. "Call Me By Your Name" by André Aciman. Transformed into a passionately beautiful movie a few years ago, Aciman's 2007 novel takes ...

ST. LOUIS — The back hardwood stairs of the historic Taille de Noyer, an antebellum home in Florissant, Missouri that started as a two-room log cabin for fur traders, tell many stories. The stairs are worn and dipped in the middle, points out the foreword of a new book about slavery in north St. Louis County. “Let us remember that some of the feet on those steps did not walk there by choice, ...

After being crowned Miss World 2000, Priyanka Chopra Jonas began receiving offers for prominent roles in Bollywood in her native India. But in the eyes of some industry leaders, the pageant winner's looks still weren't enough. In "Unfinished," her new memoir released Tuesday, the actress, singer and producer recalls that — shortly after winning the international beauty pageant — a ...

"Twenty" by James Grippando; Harper (384 pages, $27.99) ——— James Grippando’s reputation for calibrating his novels about Miami defense attorney Jack Swyteck to current events continues with “Twenty.” This 17th novel may be his most timely and controversial. While including his trademarks of high suspense and character studies, Grippando also takes a massive chance by opening “Twenty” with a ...

As I write this, I'm sitting at my computer on a small enclosed porch in the upstairs of my house. I am, essentially, in the treetops. From the big windows I can watch the ever-busy squirrels, the woodpeckers pounding away at the suet feeder, the upside-down nuthatches hopping up and down the tree trunks. There are rabbit tracks in the snow. Everything I can see is gray, white or brown. I love ...

The days are getting longer, right? That means more time for reading, at least by my definition. Here are a half-dozen recommended paperback, if your bedside table is currently bare. "The Only Good Indians" by Stephen Graham Jones (Gallery / Saga Press, $16.99, out Jan. 26). Jones, whose work runs the gamut of horror, science fiction, crime fiction and experimental novels, here crafts "a ...

“Prisoners of History: What Monuments to World II Tell us About our History and Ourselves” by Keith Lowe; William Collins (302 pages, $29.99) ––– A pedestal is a risky place to take a stand. In America, official tributes to leaders from Robert E. Lee to Abraham Lincoln have been destroyed or defaced. In Europe, memorials to Communist dictators have been torn down. In the Middle East, even ...

For a whole lot of reasons, it might feel right this month to focus on books that take us somewhere else — to another time and place far from here. So "The House on Vesper Sands," by Irish author Paraic O'Donnell, seemed to be dropped in my lap as a gift from the crime-fiction gods. It takes place in 1893 London, on a series of wintry nights made otherworldly, a character notices, by snow. "He ...

Following the Christmas Day release of "Bridgerton" on Netflix, demand for the books behind the series has skyrocketed — and so has their cost, with paperbacks out of stock, as first reported by People.com, and original hardcovers on sale for up to $800. The drama, from executive producer Shonda Rhimes, is set in 19th century England, a world in which bejeweled debutantes in dire need of sex ...

“Black Firsts: 500 Years of Trailblazing Achievements and Ground-Breaking Events” by Jessie Carney Smith; Visible Ink Press (704 pages; $29.95) ––– It’s painful being a pioneer. “Black Firsts: 500 Years of Trailblazing Achievements and Ground-Breaking Events” is a proud celebration of Black success. But its thousands of entries – groundbreakers in every field – often come with nagging ...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News