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Officials in one of Florida’s most populated counties are trying to fix a ballot question about a proposed school tax that was inaccuartely translated into Spanish on voter ballots. The issue came to light when a Spanish-speaking voter contacted the South Florida SunSentinel. Voters are being asked to double the tax rate to help cover costs of teacher raises, hiring of more school security staff and the bolstering of mental health programs. The proposal increases the tax from one mill  — which is about $50 per $100,000 in home value — to a full mill. The Spanish version translated “one mill" to “one million."

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Arkansas lawmakers have given initial approval to a $500 million tax cut package. The majority-Republican House and Senate on Wednesday approved identical versions of bills outlining the tax cuts proposed by GOP Gov. Asa Hutchinson. Hutchinson called a special session to take up the tax cuts after the state's surplus reached $1.6 billion. The tax cuts passed over objections from Democrats who questioned whether the move would jeopardize some of the state's COVID-19 relief money. Democrats have also said lawmakers should raise teacher pay. Final votes on the tax cuts are expected in both chambers on Thursday.

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Arkansas lawmakers have advanced tax cuts and a school safety grant program as they kicked off a special session. The House and Senate Revenue and Taxation committees endorsed identical bills Tuesday outlining tax cuts proposed by Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson. The tax cut plan includes accelerating reductions in corporate and individual income taxes that lawmakers approved last year. The Joint Budget Committee also endorsed legislation setting aside $50 million for school safety grants. Hutchinson called for the program following the May shooting at a Uvalde, Texas, elementary school that killed 19 students and two teachers. Democrats have been calling for the Legislature to take up teacher raises, but they face resistance from GOP legislative leaders.

Members of North Carolina’s leading teacher advocacy group are criticizing a proposed overhaul of public school instructor pay and licensing. The North Carolina Association of Educators held a news conference Tuesday. It's unhappy with a licensure model released months ago that's based on recommendations coming out of a state commission. A performance-pay model has the support of state Superintendent Catherine Truitt and State Board of Education chairman Eric Davis. NCAE Vice President Bryan Proffitt says the existing experienced-based salary schedule will help recruit and retain educators if it's sufficiently funded. A final proposal will require the backing of the board and the General Assembly.

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Arkansas lawmakers are meeting this week for a special session on tax cuts and school safety grants that's been spurred by the state's $1.6 billion surplus. The House and Senate are set to meet starting Tuesday for the session. The leadup to the session has been dominated by a push by Democratic lawmakers to raise teachers salaries. Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson called for teacher raises earlier this year but said he wouldn't put it on the session agenda. The tax cut package on the session agenda includes accelerating reductions the majority-GOP Legislature approved last year.

A Minnesota school district is clashing with the teachers union and LGBTQ allies over a proposed policy that opponents say would undermine equity and inclusion. The proposal by three Becker school board members prohibits “political indoctrination or the teaching of inherently divisive concepts,” in the district’s schools. Those against such a policy say the district is trying to stifle free speech, suppress LGBTQ students and advocates and prohibit the accurate teaching of history and other subjects. It’s the latest instance of polarizing issues that have surfaced in school districts elsewhere; including classroom pride flags, teaching critical race theory and supporting marginalized students.

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Officials say a lightning strike during an outdoors educator course in the Bridger-Teton National Forest in Wyoming has killed one student. Another student at the event was injured Tuesday evening when a storm hit the area where the group with the National Outdoors Leadership School was camping south of Yellowstone National Park. Teton County Coroner Brent Blue says 22-year-old John D. Murphy of Boston died of cardiac arrest because of the lightning strike. The injured student was flown to an Idaho hospital for treatment and released Wednesday. The school teaches students how to be outdoors educators and holds classes around the world.

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A recent decision by a Wisconsin school district to ban pride flags and the use of pronouns in emails has released an avalanche of pushback from students, alumni and others while the superintendent said it’s simple reaffirming a policy that is already in place. Kettle Moraine School District Superintendent Ken Plum recently told the school board an interpretation of a policy that prohibits staff from using their positions to promote partisan politics, religious views and propaganda for personal, monetary or nonmonetary gain has changed following a legal analysis. Plum said teachers and administrators are prohibited from displaying political or religious messages in their classrooms or on their person, including Pride flags, Black Lives Matter and We Back the Badge signs.

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Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp is using federal COVID-19 relief money to give teachers another $125 to buy school supplies. The move comes months after he issued a similar stipend. A Republican who is running for reelection, Kemp made the announcement Friday at a high school in Henry County. Teachers got $125 for supplies from the same source last year. The last supplement cost about $15.9 million. The total cost for this round of spending has yet to be finalized. Democrats say Kemp is getting credit for handing out COVID-19 relief when he and other Republicans opposed some spending.

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Democrat Stacey Abrams is promoting a plan she says will make housing more available and affordable across Georgia if she defeats Republican Gov. Brian Kemp this year. Abrams aims to increase the inventory of housing, keep people from being pushed out of gentrifying neighborhoods and reduce homelessness. Meanwhile she says Kemp is sitting on $450 million in federal rental assistance that could keep Georgians from getting evicted. Other Abrams plans would increase pay for teachers, state troopers and prison guards and tighten state gun laws. Kemp has yet to unveil proposals for what he would do in a second term.

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Arkansas lawmakers took back the authority they gave for the state to distribute about $460 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds to schools, saying they want the money to go toward teacher bonuses. The move by the Legislative Council on Thursday faced opposition from Democrats who called it an effort to avoid considering raising teacher salaries while the state sits on a $1.6 billion surplus. It was also criticized by Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson. Democrats are pushing to put teacher raises on the agenda for next month's special session focused on tax cuts.

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Former sports superstar Bo Jackson helped pay for the funerals of the 19 children and two teachers who were killed in the Uvalde school massacre in May. Jackson's rare success in pro football and baseball made him one of the greatest athletes of his generation. The donation was previously anonymous, but Jackson told The Associated Press on Wednesday that he felt compelled to support the victims’ families after the loss of so many children. He says he felt a personal connection to the city he’s driven through many times. Uvalde has been a regular stop for a bite to eat or groceries before a long drive farther west to visit a friend’s ranch on hunting trips.

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A far-right Maryland legislator endorsed by former President Donald Trump has won the Republican primary for governor. Dan Cox defeated a moderate rival backed by outgoing Gov. Larry Hogan. Cox will face the winner of the Democratic primary in the November general election. A bestselling author backed by Oprah Winfrey, Wes Moore, had an early lead Tuesday night, with the focus starting to turn to mail ballots that won’t be counted until later in the week. Despite being a win for Trump, Cox’s victory over former Hogan Cabinet member Kelly Schulz could be a blow to Republican chances to hold on to the seat in November.

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Arkansas gubernatorial hopeful Chris Jones is calling for an increase in teacher salaries in the state. Jones' announcement on Tuesday follows a push by fellow Democrats to put teacher pay raises on the agenda for a legislative session next month. Jones endorsed a pay raise proposal that Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson made but has said won't make it on the session agenda because of lack of support in the GOP Legislature. Jones is running against Republican nominee and former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. Sanders is widely favored in November in the solidly GOP state.

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A settlement between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones in a tenure dispute includes concessions designed to help faculty and students of color. Hannah-Jones tweeted on Tuesday that she and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund fought for the concession, which were not mentioned in the university’s settlement announcement last Friday. At the time, the school said the settlement with Hannah-Jones was for less than $75,000 and was approved by the school's chancellor. Hannah-Jones said the settlement includes $5,000 reserved in the provost’s office to pay for meeting expenses and events sponsored by the Carolina Black Caucus per year through June 2025.

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