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The Vermont Agency of Education and several school districts will pay school tuition and legal fees to five families to settle lawsuits challenging the state’s practice of not paying for students to attend religious schools if their towns do not have a public school. The two sides agreed to dismiss the lawsuits in court filings late Wednesday. The settlements come in the aftermath of a June U.S. Supreme Court ruling that said Maine schools cannot exclude religious schools from a program that offers tuition aid for private education. Like Maine, Vermont pays a tuition benefit for students living in towns that do not have a public school to attend other public schools or approved private schools of their choice.

North Carolina’s State Board of Education has backed an incremental approach to advance a potential teacher licensure overhaul. The board voted on Thursday with no opposition for a motion that in part envisions piloting or testing a new license and performance program before it could potentially be carried out statewide. It ultimately would take the General Assembly’s formal approval to move the idea forward and provide funding. A draft statewide plan that's been discussed would include higher instructor pay based on performance rather than years of experience. Board Chairman Eric Davis says creating pilots in school districts could help a statewide licensing remake become a success.

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Most schools in Scotland were closed Thursday as thousands of teachers walked off the job, joining scores of postal workers and university lecturers in industrial action to demand better pay and working conditions to cope with the country’s cost-of-living crisis. The teachers’ strike in Scotland, which shuttered every school on the Scottish mainland, was the first such one in the region in 40 years. Elsewhere across the U.K., picket lines were set up outside postal offices and universities in one of the biggest co-ordinated walkouts this year. In universities, some 70,000 academic staff were striking Thursday and again on Nov. 30. Britons have faced travel misery and overflowing garbage bins in recent months as workers in multiple industries launched successive strikes.

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A program in Charleston is trying to make the teaching profession more accessible to Black men, who are vastly underrepresented in classrooms in South Carolina and around the United States. Just 7% of America’s public school teachers were Black during the 2017-18 school year although Black students make up 15% of the student population, according to the most recently available data from the National Center for Education Statistics. The program in Charleston, Men of CHS Teach, places new teachers in elementary classrooms even if they haven’t participated in a student teacher program.

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Republican groups that sought to get hundreds of “parents’ rights” activists elected to local school boards largely fell short in Tuesday’s elections. The push has been boosted by Republican groups including the 1776 Project PAC, but just a third of its roughly 50 candidates won. Local school boards have became fiercely political amid battles over the teaching of race, history and sexuality. The mixed results raise doubts about the political strength of the parents’ right platform, which demands transparency around teaching but also includes a wide range of cultural stances, calling for the removal of certain books in schools and an end to history lessons that aren’t “patriotic.”

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A North Carolina commission has agreed to move forward with efforts to change how teachers are licensed and paid. The Professional Educator Preparation and Standards Commission voted on Thursday to back a summary of licensure and compensation goals to pass along to the State Board of Education. The commission already has been refining a licensure and pay plan that ultimately would need buy-in from the board and funding from the General Assembly. A draft plan would switch the state from a pay system for licensed teachers largely based on experience to one based on different types of licenses that teachers advance to based on their effectiveness.

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Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson is recommending his state increase public school funding as he prepares to leave office. The Republican governor on Thursday detailed his budget proposal to a legislative panel. The recommendations come days after Republican Sarah Huckabee Sanders was elected the state's next governor. Hutchinson recommended that the state increase public school funding over the next two years by $550 million. Sanders announced her transition team on Thursday and stopped short of saying whether she agrees with Hutchinson's recommendations.

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Voters in West Virginia rejected four proposed amendments to the state constitution on election day. That includes two proposals that would have given the Republican-dominated legislature more power to regulate public education policy and certain taxes. Other amendments would have prohibited the state Supreme Court intervention in the Legislature’s impeachment trials and allowed churches to incorporate. Amendment 4 would have required the state Board of Education to submit new rules and regulations to the legislature annually for final approval. Republican Gov. Jim Justice and GOP state legislative leaders clashed over Amendment 2. It would have given state lawmakers the ability to eliminate a business and inventory tax along with the vehicle tax.

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Oklahoma’s Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt has held off a tougher-than-expected challenge to his reelection, defeating Democrat Joy Hofmeister. The 49-year-old Stitt won despite Hofmeister’s support from many of the state’s Native American tribes with whom Stitt had feuded during much of his first term. Stitt was aided in part by a late infusion of advertisements from the Republican Governor’s Association. Those ads linked Hofmeister to President Joe Biden, who lost every one of the state’s 77 counties in the 2020 presidential election. They also criticized Hofmeister for supporting a series of tax increases in 2018 that helped fund pay raises for teachers.

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Education and civil rights groups say they will sue to overturn Georgia’s law banning the teaching of certain racial concepts. They claimed Friday that the ban on so-called divisive concepts violates First Amendment rights to free expression and 14th Amendment rights to equal protection. The Southern Poverty Law Center, the National Education Association and the Georgia Association of Educators sent the notice to Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr. A spokesperson for Carr declined comment. Republicans say the law was necessary to ban the teaching of critical race theory. Opponents argue it's classroom censorship that violates rights of students and teachers.

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The Supreme Court of Virginia has heard arguments in the case of a high school teacher who was fired after he refused to use a transgender student’s pronouns. Lawyers for French teacher Peter Vlaming argued Friday that West Point High School violated his constitutional right to speak freely and exercise his religion. But an attorney for the school told the high court that the teacher violated the school’s anti-discrimination policy. Vlaming appealed a lower court’s ruling dismissing the lawsuit and is asking the Supreme Court to reinstate it. The justices did not indicate how soon they could rule.

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Around 1,500 demonstrators gathered at the headquarters of Hungary’s public media company have protested what they say is biased news coverage and state-sponsored propaganda that favors the country’s populist government. Demonstrators called for the director of the public media corporation, MTVA, to be replaced. They also demanded due coverage of a recent wave of major protests and strikes by Hungarian teachers and students for better pay and working conditions for educators. Hungarian public media ignored most of those actions despite some protests drawing tens of thousands of people. Under the leadership of nationalist Prime Minister Viktor Orban, the Hungarian government has been accused of eroding press freedom and rolling back democratic checks and balances.

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Joe Lepley, 70, of Galesville, WI, died peacefully after a brief illness on August 31, 2022. He was originally from Tulsa, OK and graduated fr…

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