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Letter: Tearing down Pedestrian Bridge will have long-term consequences to quality of life
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Letter: Tearing down Pedestrian Bridge will have long-term consequences to quality of life

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The Midland Valley Bridge’s demolition has caused irreparable harm to Tulsa’s history and community, despite claims to the contrary.

This demolition will adversely affect the quality of life of users of River Parks for years to come, both due to the forthcoming lack of permanent shade and, sadly, the loss of collective memory and multi-generational associations with the old bridge.

City officials violated the public trust by making highly misleading and unquestionably false statements on this issue, beginning several years ago, effectively defrauding the public through using unscrupulous pretexts as the basis to demolish and build new, as well as to transfer millions of dollars away from the historic bridge to their wasteful brainchild bridge.

Moreover, the public’s dissenting voices were repeatedly blocked from participation at multiple City Council meetings, even in violation of the Council’s own rules, which indicated citizens could place items on a regular meeting’s agenda.

Sympathetic councilors were then intimidated into compliance.

Far from what he would claim, Mayor G.T. Bynum has permanently tarnished his legacy. Even the Gathering Place has allowed a dark cloud to come over it — larger than was caused by the Blair Mansion fiasco.

The full consequences of this misconduct and willful destruction have not yet materialized, but it is too late to stop the reverberations.

While many citizens tried to convince officials to make the right choice — to halt the demolition, to try to preserve and blend, rather than to deceive, destroy and profit — these officials have instead cemented their own folly.

Letters to the editor are encouraged. Send letters to tulsaworld.com/opinion/submitletter.


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