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Letter: Self-defense argument for Rittenhouse is thin
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Letter: Self-defense argument for Rittenhouse is thin

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In the Kyle Rittenhouse case, how do we know that the slain men were not the ones defending themselves against an aggressor strutting among protesters with his “cool” gun that not even police officers carry in the streets?

None of the silent videos would preclude that reality, but the dead cannot defend themselves. G.K. Chesterton, in his writing "The Defendant," concludes: "The main business of a man, however humble, is defense."

The ultimate tactic is “self-defense,” and the “defendant” in this case had moved way beyond “humble.” Indeed, Rittenhouse confessed that he had not been truthful throughout the entire episode, even under oath.

Letters to the editor are encouraged. Send letters to tulsaworld.com/opinion/submitletter.


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Kyle Rittenhouse has been acquitted of all charges after pleading self-defense in the deadly Kenosha, Wisconsin, shootings that became a flashpoint in the nation's debate over guns, vigilantism and racial injustice. The jury came back with its verdict after close to 3 1/2 days of deliberation. Rittenhouse, 18, could have gotten life in prison if found guilty of the most serious charge against him.

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