Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Editorial: Mayfest's return to downtown Tulsa is the latest sign that things are looking brighter

Editorial: Mayfest's return to downtown Tulsa is the latest sign that things are looking brighter

  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}
Mayfest through the years (copy) (copy)

Tulsa Mayest will return to the Tulsa Arts District in May.

Remember when Mayfest organizers had nothing more threatening than the chance of a spring thunderstorm to worry about?

Nature’s true destructive potential showed the city what it could do with the pandemic of 2020, which, among many other things, led to the annual art show’s cancellation.

The latest example that normalcy — after a fashion — is returning to the world was last week’s announcement that Mayfest is coming back.

The mostly outdoor event that was a mainstay of downtown life prior to the pandemic is set to return May 7-9 on the north edge of downtown, from the Tulsa Arts District to historic Greenwood.

The Tulsa Health Department has approved the safety plan compiled for the festival. That means masked vendors, staff and volunteers. Guests will be strongly encouraged to mask up, too.

The festival will be engineered to provide for one-way traffic flow where possible, hand-washing facilities or hand-sanitizing stations, physical barriers and guides to create social distance and touchless payment options where possible.

Mayfest will limit indoor events, keep attendance there at a minimum and maintain appropriate health protocols.

Some details are being worked out, and that might lead to additional hygiene rules, which we urge Mayfest patrons will follow for their own good.

As with all such plans to reopen, it’s important for Mayfest organizers to continue to follow the science and be ready to make hard decisions again, if necessary to protect the public health. We all hope that the pandemic is fading away, but we’ve been unpleasantly surprised by the progress of events before, and we need to be ready to pivot if necessary.

Among those who have been hit hardest by the COVID-19 contraction are performers and the traveling artist who rely on events like Mayfest for their incomes.

Last year’s cancellation was bad economic news for the artists and depressing for the city: Evidence of how much we were losing because of the virus.

Mayfest’s return will be a happy day for Tulsa. We hope it once again becomes an annual tradition that brings big, happy, healthy crowds downtown to celebrate spring and art.

And we hope it doesn’t rain.


Wayne Greene reads the March 26 Tulsa  World editorial: Vaccination success story.

Wayne Greene reads the March 26 Tulsa World editorial: Vaccination success story.

Subscribe to Daily Headlines

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Catch the latest in Opinion

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

If approved, SB 838 would allow cities to fund some police, fire or emergency medical services costs with a property tax of up to 5 mills. That would leave the municipal sales tax revenue to fund any remainder of public safety costs and other city services, such as parks, public transportation and animal welfare. It also would allow the city to try more innovative public service efforts, such increased availability of mental health crisis teams.

Best known to the public for his four years in Congress from eastern Oklahoma's 2nd District, Carson has legitimate academic credentials. He grew up in Jenks, earned his bachelor's degree at Baylor University with Phi Beta Kappa honors, attended Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar and earned a law degree from the University of Oklahoma. He is currently on the faculty at the University of Virginia, teaching courses in national security and the public sector.

  • Updated

Shrum is a public college and Oklahoma higher education success story, the editorial says. A native of Coweta, she did undergraduate work at Connor State College, Northeastern State University and the University of Arkansas. She earned her medical degree at OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine. She also has completed executive leadership and management training programs at Harvard University and Stanford University.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News