Skip to main contentSkip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
In honor of Independence Day, Tulsa World is providing unlimited access to all of our content from June 28th-July 4th! Presented by Grigsby's Carpet Tile & Hardwood
AP

US sending advanced rocket systems, other aid to Ukraine

  • Updated
  • 0

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States will send another $450 million in military aid to Ukraine, including some additional medium-range rocket systems, to help push back Russian progress in the war, officials announced Thursday.

The latest package includes four High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems, or HIMARS, which will double the number they have now. All four were prepositioned in Europe, and training on those systems has already begun with the Ukrainian troops who will use them, said Marine Corps Lt. Col. Anton Semelroth, a Pentagon spokesman. The first four HIMARS that the U.S. previously sent have already gone to the battlefield in Ukraine and are in the hands of troops there.

According to the Pentagon, the aid also includes 18 tactical vehicles that are used to tow howitzers, so the weapons can be moved around the battlefield, as well as 18 coastal and riverine patrol boats, thousands of machine guns, grenade launchers and rounds of ammunition, and some other equipment and spare parts.

The new aid comes just a week after the U.S. announced it was sending $1 billion in military aid to Ukraine, and as the Russian military continues to slowly expand its control in the eastern Donbas region. Ukrainian leaders have persistently asked for the more advanced, precision rocket systems in order to better fight back against Russia.

The Russian military captured two villages in eastern Ukraine on Thursday and is fighting for control of a key highway in a campaign to cut supply lines and encircle frontline Ukrainian forces, according to British and Ukrainian military officials.

Russian forces have been bombarding the city of Sievierodonetsk for weeks with artillery and air raids, and fought the Ukrainian army house-to-house. The HIMARS gives Ukraine the ability to strike Russian forces and weapons from further away, making it less risky for Ukrainian troops. The systems are mounted on trucks, which carry a container with six precision-guided rockets that can travel about 45 miles (70 kilometers).

It took about three weeks to train Ukrainian troops on the first four HIMARS, before the systems were moved to the fight.

The aid is part of the $40 billion in security and economic assistance passed last month by Congress and signed into law by President Joe Biden. And it is the 13th package of military weapons and equipment committed to Ukraine since the war began.

Overall, since the war started in late February, the U.S. has committed about $6.1 billion in security assistance to Ukraine, including this latest package. The $450 million in equipment and weapons will be from drawdown authority, which means the Defense Department will take it all from its own stocks and ship it to Ukraine.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

0 Comments

Get Government & Politics updates in your inbox!

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

Two of Congress’ staunchest conservatives repelled more centrist challengers to lock up Republican nominations on Tuesday. That happened even as the party’s voters chose to turn out a six-term incumbent in Mississippi. Illinois Republican Rep. Mary Miller, who called the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade a “historic victory for white life” during a weekend rally with former President Donald Trump — her spokesperson said she misspoke — defeated fellow GOP incumbent Rodney Davis. Another Trump ally, Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert, one of Congress’ most polarizing members, easily beat back a challenge from a more mainstream Republican. Mississippi Republican Rep. Steven Palazzo, a six-term incumbent, lost to Sheriff Mike Ezell.

The latest testimony about the events surrounding the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has Donald Trump rebuffing his own security’s warnings about armed protesters in the crowd gathering for a rally near the White House. A former White House aide also tells the House committee investigating the attack that Trump desperately attempted to join his supporters as they marched to the Capitol. In her testimony Tuesday, Cassidy Hutchinson described an angry, defiant president who grabbed at the steering wheel of the presidential SUV when the Secret Service refused to allow him go to the Capitol. Trump has dismissed her as “a total phony.”

U.S. Sen. James Lankford has won the GOP primary outright in his race for reelection to another six-year term in the U.S. Senate. And in the state's other U.S. Senate race, U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin and T.W. Shannon advanced to a Republican runoff. Lankford defeated Tulsa pastor Jackson Lahmeyer and Joan Farr of Broken Arrow in Tuesday’s primary. Mullin and Shannon advanced from a 13-candidate field in the race to replace retiring U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe. Both GOP primary winners will be heavy favorites to defeat the Democratic primary winner in November’s general election. Oklahoma hasn’t elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in more than three decades.

Voters in Colorado’s Republican primaries have decisively rejected right-wing candidates for U.S. Senate, governor and secretary of state as the party prepares to challenge Democrats’ stranglehold on the state’s top offices. Voters on Tuesday also selected their November nominees in the state’s eight congressional districts, with a new, northern Colorado swing district in play after the state gained a seat with redistricting. In a state that’s trended purple over the past decade, Colorado’s congressional delegation includes two Democratic senators, with three-term Sen. Michael Bennet seeking re-election this year. Democrats hold a 4-3 advantage among U.S. representatives. Also on the statewide ballot are uncontested primaries for attorney general and state treasurer.

Conservative think tank CEO Ellen Weaver has won the Republican nomination for South Carolina education superintendent. Weaver was the second-place finisher in the primary earlier this month, but vaulted past Palmetto State Teachers Association Executive Director Kathy Maness on Tuesday. Weaver will face Democratic teacher and SC for Ed founder Lisa Ellis in November. Weaver could still face a rough road to the job. A new South Carolina law requires education superintendents to have at least a master’s degree. Weaver doesn’t have one, but started a program in April. Election officials said there is no precedent for what happens if she wins in November without an advanced degree. A lawsuit is likely.

Suburban Chicago personal injury lawyer Kathy Salvi has won the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Illinois. Salvi topped a field of seven candidates Tuesday to win the nod to take on first-term incumbent Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth in November. Duckworth is a veteran of the Iraq War and is very popular in Illinois. Salvi campaigned on a pledge to work to unify the warring factions of her party. She maintains Duckworth is beatable because the fall election will be a vote about the success or failure of the Biden administration.

The House Jan. 6 committee held a surprise hearing Tuesday delivering alarming new testimony about Donald Trump’s actions that day. Witness Cassidy Hutchinson is a lesser-known former White House aide who had proximity to power as an adviser to the then-president and his chief of staff Mark Meadows. She rebuffed Trump’s team warnings against testifying and provided firsthand knowledge of what she saw and heard in the run-up to the insurrection. She described an angry and defiant Trump who ignored repeated warnings against summoning the mob to the Capitol on Jan. 6 and then refused to intervene to stop the violence as rioters laid siege.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma testified as part of a civil case into an alleged sexual assault at the Baptist church camp he oversaw that he believed a 13-year-old can consent to sex. The Associated Press obtained a copy of Lankford’s deposition from 2010, before he'd joined Congress. A 13-year-old girl's family sued a 15-year-old boy who was alleged to have had sex with her at the camp, and also sued the camp’s owner and operator. Lankford isn’t alleged to have had any knowledge of the assault and wasn’t accused of any wrongdoing. Oklahoma's age of consent is 16. There’s no provision in state law under which a 13-year-old could consent to sex. A Lankford reelection campaign spokeswoman declined comment.

All four members of the U.S. House from Utah defeated Republican primary challengers Tuesday. First-term Congressman Blake Moore won the nomination over two challengers in District 1, and Chris Stewart, John Curtis and Burgess Owens each defeated a single challenger. The Democratic nominations for those races are not contested. This primary election is the first since the GOP-dominated state Legislature approved new redistricting maps that further split up Democratic-leaning Salt Lake City, effectively shoring up Republican advantages in each of the state’s four districts.

Tulsa attorney Gentner Drummond has knocked off incumbent Attorney General John O’Connor in the Republican primary in the race for Oklahoma attorney general. With no Democrat and only a Libertarian on the November ballot, Tuesday’s victory for the 58-year-old Drummond means he is almost certain to be Oklahoma’s next attorney general. The 67-year-old O’Connor was Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt’s hand-picked successor after former Attorney General Mike Hunter resigned last year. Drummond is a former fighter pilot who served eight years in the military before getting his law degree from Georgetown University and returning to Oklahoma.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

News Alert