Skip to main contentSkip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
AP

Court sets fall arguments on trans youth treatment ban

  • Updated
  • 0

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A federal appeals court will hear arguments in November over Alabama’s efforts to outlaw the use of gender-affirming medications to treat transgender minors.

Alabama is asking a federal appeals court to lift an injunction and let it enforce a law that would make it a felony to give puberty blockers or hormones to transgender minors to help affirm their gender identity. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has tentatively set arguments for the week of Nov. 14 in Montgomery.

U.S. District Judge Liles Burke in May issued a preliminary injunction to stop the state from enforcing the medication ban while a lawsuit goes forward.

Families and advocacy groups challenged the ban as an illegal intrusion into family and medical decisions. Alabama has maintained the ban is needed to protect children.

The state has appealed. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey in May referred to the injunction as a “temporary legal roadblock.”

Alabama's appeal cites the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on abortion, invoking the majority opinion that argues that unenumerated constitutional rights — those not explicitly mentioned in the document — must be “deeply rooted in the Nation’s history and traditions.”

A judge blocked a similar law from taking effect in Arkansas. A three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in July heard arguments in that state's appeal.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

0 Comments

Get Government & Politics updates in your inbox!

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

The FBI has searched former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate as part of an investigation into whether he took classified records from the White House to his Florida residence. That's according to people familiar with the matter who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation. Trump says agents opened up a safe at his home and describes their work as an “unannounced raid” that he likened to “prosecutorial misconduct.” The FBI and Justice Department have not confirmed the search. It marks a dramatic and unprecedented escalation of law enforcement scrutiny of the former president.

Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota won a closer-than-expected Democratic primary race against a centrist challenger who questioned Omar's support for the “defund the police” movement. Another progressive, Becca Balint, won the Democratic House primary in Vermont, positioning her to become the first woman representing the state in Congress. And in Minnesota, Republican Brad Finstad was headed to Congress to serve the remaining months of the late Rep. Jim Hagedorn’s term. A key race also unfolded in western Wisconsin, where Democratic Rep. Ron Kind’s retirement after 26 years in office opens up a seat in a district that has been trending Republican.

Ukraine says that nine Russian warplanes were destroyed in a deadly string of explosions at an air base in Crimea that appeared to be the result of a Ukrainian attack. That would represent a significant escalation in the war. Russia denied any aircraft were damaged in Tuesday’s blasts — or that any attack took place. Ukrainian officials have stopped short of claiming responsibility for the explosions at the Saki air base. Satellite photos taken Wednesday showed damaged warplanes. In Ukraine’s east, where fighting has raged for eight years, a Russian attack on Bakhmut in the Donetsk region killed seven, wounded six and damaged stores, homes and apartment buildings, setting off fires

The FBI’s unprecedented search of former President Donald Trump’s Florida residence is ricocheting around government, politics and a polarized country. Trump and his allies are complaining, and others are wondering Tuesday why the Justice Department — notably cautious under Attorney General Merrick Garland — decided to take such a drastic step. The FBI searched Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate as part of an investigation into whether he took classified records there from the White House. That’s according to people familiar with the matter who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation. Trump says agents opened a safe at his home, and he likens their search to “prosecutorial misconduct.”

Donald Trump says he invoked the Fifth Amendment and wouldn’t answer questions under oath in the long-running New York civil investigation into his business dealings. Trump arrived at New York Attorney General Letitia James’ offices Wednesday morning, but sent out a statement more than an hour later saying he declined to answer the questions under the rights and privileges afforded to every citizen under the United States Constitution.” Anything he said during the deposition could have been used against him in a criminal case, if one ensues. While James’ investigation is civil in nature, the Manhattan district attorney is running a parallel criminal probe.

Powerful explosions have rocked a Russian air base in Crimea, and authorities say at least one person was killed and several others wounded. Russia’s Defense Ministry says that munitions blew up at the Saki base and that the installation was not shelled. It said no warplanes were damaged. But Ukrainian social networks are abuzz with speculation that it was hit by Ukrainian-fired long-range missiles. Ukraine's Defense Ministry has not commented on the cause of the blasts. If the base was, in fact, struck by the Ukrainians, it would mark the first known major attack on a Russian military site on the Crimean Peninsula, annexed by the Kremlin in 2014.

Kenya is seeing lower voter turnout in an unusual presidential election as some voters cite little hope of change. A longtime opposition leader who is backed by the outgoing president faces the deputy president who styles himself as the outsider. The electoral commission says turnout was 56% an hour before polls closed. Turnout in the previous election was 80%. The election has been close but calm. East Africa’s economic hub could see a presidential runoff for the first time. Economic issues could be of greater importance than the ethnic tensions that have marked past votes. Results must be announced within a week.

Whether an FBI search of Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence is a prelude to criminal charges is unknown — especially unclear since other investigations into mishandling of classified information have ended without prosecution or in misdemeanor plea deals. The search focuses new attention on the thicket of statutes that govern the handling of government records. Much remains uncertain about Monday’s search, including what precisely the FBI was looking for and why it acted when it did. The Justice Department has been investigating the discovery of classified material in 15 boxes of White House records that the National Archives and Records Administration recovered from Mar-A-Lago earlier this year.

The House panel investigating the U.S. Capitol insurrection has interviewed former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and met briefly with Pennsylvania’s Republican nominee for governor Doug Mastriano as it probes Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election. Pompeo is among several former Cabinet officials the committee wanted to hear from after it was disclosed that some considered invoking the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office. Pompeo's appearance Tuesday was confirmed by a person granted anonymity to discuss the situation. Mastriano appeared less than 15 minutes and questioned the validity of the process, his attorney said. Mastriano helped organize efforts in Pennsylvania to submit alternate electors beholden to Trump.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

News Alert