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Cherokee Nation celebrates opening of Career Services satellite office in Wagoner

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Cherokee Nation Career Services

The Cherokee Nation Career Services will use the new field office, located at 109 N. Casaver Ave. in downtown Wagoner, to provide various training opportunities and career assistance programs.

Cherokee Nation leaders gathered with Wagoner County officials Tuesday to cut a ribbon on a new satellite office.

The Cherokee Nation Career Services will use the new field office, located at 109 N. Casaver Ave. in downtown Wagoner, to provide various training opportunities and career assistance, including its Coming Home Re-entry and Justice-Involved program, tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Talking Leaves Job Corps recruitment, TERO and other services.

“We have quite a number of clients in the Wagoner area, so it really behooves us to be here,” Career Services Executive Director Diane Kelley said. “Wagoner is a thriving community and we’re proud to be a part of it.”

Wagoner Mayor Albert Jones added, “The relationship with our local community and the Cherokee Nation is really good, and it’s good to have those partnerships. People want to work and need life skills. Sometimes, they weren’t able to get those life skills in more traditional places growing up. Right here we have the perfect example of helping them get back to work.”

The new Wagoner officer serves as the Cherokee Nation’s ninth Career Services satellite office in the Cherokee Nation Reservation.

Cherokee Nation citizen Tyler Daugherty has participated in the Cherokee Nation’s Re-entry program and helped to cut the ribbon on Wagoner’s new office space on Tuesday.

“The Re-entry program helped me get reintroduced back into society and gave me the tools and opportunity to go back to school and get certifications,” Daugherty said. “A year ago today I was doing nothing, and now I am starting as a salesman for a paper company in Muskogee. So, it really has given me the opportunity to turn my life around.”

In 2019, Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. and Deputy Chief Bryan Warner created the Career Readiness Act of 2019 with support from the Council of the Cherokee Nation, doubling the tribe’s funding each year to train Cherokees in areas of construction, health, information technology and lineman trade jobs.

Then in 2021, Hoskin Jr. announced an additional $29 million investment over three years to help Cherokee citizens negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic receive vocational training in skilled trades, as part of the Hoskin-Warner Administration’s theme of “Together: Community, Family, Culture.”

“I truly believe the most powerful thing the Cherokee Nation can do for its citizens is to give them a platform to achieve their own dreams. Cherokee Nation’s Career Services department is critical to that effort,” Hoskin Jr. said. “I know that if Cherokee Nation provides a foundation for success, the Cherokee people will build something amazing on that foundation. This new office in Wagoner is a big part of that mission.”

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