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Heartwood Commons to become first co-housing community for Tulsa

Heartwood Commons to become first co-housing community for Tulsa

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To many people, “co-housing,” is an unheard-of term.

Not to Suzy Sharp.

“It is a model that balances the privacy of your own home with the benefit of living in an intentionally connected community,” she said of the concept, which started in Denmark. “In co-housing, neighbors become friends and private homes are clustered around common spaces.

“… It has been intentionally designed to create a rich, interconnected community while supporting successful aging in place.”

Sharp will be among the residents of Heartwood Commons, a $14 million co-housing project on which organizers broke ground Thursday at 7141 S. Quincy Ave.

Designed for the 55-and-older crowd, Heartwood Commons will feature 36 housing units — ranging from 750 to 1,500 square feet — in series of two-, three- and four-residential clusters.

Units start at $258,000, Sharp said. Complementing the units will be a large common house, which will include a gourmet kitchen, a great room for shared meals and other activities, a living room for more intimate gatherings, an art room and two guest rooms.

Other shared amenities include community gardens, a wood shop, greenhouse, contemplative space and a pet park. In addition to their private homes and shared community spaces, the residents also have equity in the entire acreage.

“Our sister (co-housing) community in Stillwater reminds us all the time that when you are joining a co-housing community, you are really buying the community and the house just happens to come with it,” Sharp said.

Two Tulsa companies, Jones Design Studio and Stava Building Corp., are handling design and construction. More than 50 sites were considered for the project, said Molly Jones, founder and president of Jones Design Studio.

“... The buildings are the backdrop to the play which is the building and maintenance of community between people,” Jones said. “That’s what this project represents.”

Twenty-one of the units already have been sold.

“You just don’t see a lot of citizen-led developments really ever come to fruition,” Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum said. “It’s very rare in Tulsa. That says a lot about the commitment of those who had this vision and saw what this could mean for Tulsa, our first co-housing development.”

The village is scheduled for completion at the end of 2021 or early 2022, Sharp said.

“We’re in a time right now where we’re really trying to create a greater diversity of housing options in Tulsa,” Bynum said. “… A friend of mine, our former colleague, councilor Blake Ewing, used to say that a really great city has something for everybody. This is creating one of those options for folks in our community.”


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Rhett Morgan 918-581-8395

rhett.morgan@tulsaworld.com Twitter: @RhettMorganTW

Rhett Morgan 918-581-8395

rhett.morgan@tulsaworld.com Twitter: @RhettMorganTW

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